A Summary of the RICO Law

Neal Marder has earned widespread recognition as a leading white-collar defense attorney with a focus on class action litigation and securities fraud cases. He has successfully defended numerous clients, including China-based corporations and individuals. Among his areas of practice, Marder has gained experience in cases involving the well-known RICO law.

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In 1970, the U.S. Congress passed the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, designed to fight the operations of alleged organized crime syndicates. The law permits prosecution, as well as the levying of civil penalties, for any type of racketeering operation conducted in the course of an ongoing set of criminal activities. The racketeering charges may stem from alleged involvement in counterfeiting, money laundering, bribery, unlawful gambling, and a variety of other actions.
Since its origins as a Mafia-fighting tool for law enforcement, RICO has broadened in practice to include prosecution of a number of non-organized crime operations and organizations, including motorcycle gangs, corporations accused of environmental pollution, and protest groups focused on social issues.
To obtain a RICO conviction, the government agency plaintiff must demonstrate that the defendant was involved in at least two instances of racketeering activity and additionally maintained direct involvement in one or more criminal actions touching on foreign or domestic interstate commerce.